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Drug takes aim at cancer metastasis

 

Drug takes aim at cancer metastasis

Date:
April 1, 2019
Source:
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
Summary:
Many cancers are relatively harmless at their site of origin, and it is only when they metastasize to sites like the brain, bones, lungs, and liver that they become especially dangerous. And so, in addition to stopping the growth of cancer at its primary site, an ongoing goal of cancer research is to keep cancer contained - to stop its ability to travel through the body. A new study offers another step in an ongoing line of research aimed at exactly that.
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Many cancers are relatively harmless at their site of origin, and it is only when they metastasize to sites like the brain, bones, lungs, and liver that they become especially dangerous. And so, in addition to stopping the growth of cancer at its primary site, an ongoing goal of cancer research is to keep cancer contained -- to stop its ability to travel through the body. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2019 offers another step in an ongoing line of research aimed at exactly that.

Over the course of about a decade, the lab of Heide Ford, PhD, CU Cancer Center Associate Director and the David F. and Margaret Turley Grohne Chair in Basic Cancer Research, has shown that a "transcriptional complex" called SIX1/EYA can gift cells, and even nearby cells, with the ability to metastasize. Now the lab, in partnership with the lab of Rui Zhao, PhD, associate professor in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics at CU Anschutz Medical Campus, and with the National Institutes of Health, has identified a compound that inhibits this action. When the group administered this yet-to-be-named compound to mouse models of breast cancer, they found that it could, "dramatically suppress breast cancer associated metastasis," the study writes.

 

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Posted: 2019-04-02
 
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